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CLEO Blog

CLEO 2016 Daily Wrap: Friday

By CLEO | Posted: 10 June 2016

Highlights from Friday, 10 June at CLEO: 2016

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CLEO 2016 Daily Wrap: Thursday

By CLEO | Posted: 9 June 2016

Highlights from Thursday, June 9 at CLEO: 2016

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CLEO 2016 Daily Wrap: Wednesday

By CLEO | Posted: 8 June 2016

Highlights from Wednesday, June 8 at CLEO: 2016

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CLEO 2016 Daily Wrap: Tuesday

By CLEO | Posted: 7 June 2016

Highlights from Tuesday, June 7  at CLEO: 2016

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CLEO 2016 Daily Wrap: Monday

By CLEO | Posted: 6 June 2016

Highlights from Monday, June 6 at CLEO: 2016

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CLEO 2016 Daily Wrap: Sunday

By CLEO | Posted: 5 June 2016

Highlights from Sunday, June 5 at CLEO: 2016

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Friday Wrap Up

By CLEO | Posted: 16 May 2015

Highlights from Friday, May 15th at CLEO:2015.

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Thursday Wrap Up

By CLEO | Posted: 15 May 2015

Highlights from Thursday, May 14 at CLEO:2015.

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Exciting day filled with poster session, technical talks and International Year of Light Celebration

By Howard Lee | Posted: 15 May 2015

I started my day by attending some interesting posters in the morning. Most of the topics in the poster session today are mainly related to quantum optics, ultrafast phenomena/laser, and optical sensing. In the afternoon, I attended the “plasmonic metasurface” session and “nonlinear fiber effect” session, followed by the celebration of the International Year of Light and the last plenary session of the conference by Prof. Shuji Nakamura (UCSB, Nobel Prize Winner in Physics 2014) and Prof. Miles Padgett (University of Glasgow).

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Even Scientists Can Be Fooled Twice!

By Dr. Rick Trebino | Posted: 15 May 2015

An excerpt from SC378: Introduction to Ultrafast Optics

When a measurement averages over many different events, it faces an impossible task: Providing one result when no one result can be correct. In ultrafast optics, this issue has been particularly problematic when using the traditional method of measuring for laser pulses, called intensity autocorrelation and introduced in the 1960’s.

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